OUR HISTORY

AFUE – Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency

AFUE is the standard measurement of efficiency for gas furnaces. Given in percentages, this number tells you how much of your fuel is used to heat your home and how much fuel is wasted. For example, an AFUE of 90 means that 90% of the fuel is being used to warm your home, while the other 10% escapes as exhaust with the combustion gases. The higher the AFUE rating, the greater the efficiency. Payne offers a full line of furnaces with AFUE ratings ranging from 80% to 95%. The US Department of Energy determined that all furnaces sold in the U.S. must have a minimum AFUE of 78%. (For our Canadian customers - According to National Resources Canada, a new national minimum energy performance standard for gas furnaces went into effect on December 31, 2009. Gas furnaces for most residential applications manufactured as of that date must have a minimum fuel efficiency level of 90% AFUE.)

Energy Star*

Energy Star is the trusted, government-backed symbol for energy efficiency helping us all save money and protect the environment through energy-efficient products and practices. The Energy Star label was established to:

  • Reduce greenhouse gas emissions and other pollutants caused by the inefficient use of energy; and
  • Make it easy for consumers to identify and purchase energy-efficient products that offer savings on energy bills without sacrificing performance, features, and comfort.

HSPF – Heating Seasonal Performance Factor

HSPF is the efficiency measurement used to gauge the efficiency of the heating mode of heat pumps. The higher the number, the greater the efficiency and cost-savings. Today’s models are required to have a 6.8 HSPF.

SEER – Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio

SEER is the measure of efficiency by which the cooling process of air conditioners and heat pumps is rated. The higher the SEER number, the greater the efficiency, and therefore the greater the energy savings. Today, U.S. regulatory agencies require all new products to have a 13.0 SEER rating or better. Payne’s line of air conditioners offers SEER ratings of up to 16 SEER.

Air Handler

The portion of your air conditioner or heating system that forces air through your home’s ductwork.

BTU

British Thermal Unit, used for both heating and cooling. BTU is a measure of the heat given off when fuel is combusted. Or for cooling, it’s a measure of heat extracted from your home. (One BTU is approximately equal to the heat given off by a wooden kitchen match.)

BTUH

A British Thermal Unit (BTU) is the unit of heat required to raise 1 pound of water by 1 degree Fahrenheit. BTUH is British Thermal Units per hour.

CSA

CSA is an organization accredited by the Standards Council of Canada that tests and rates electrical product for public safety for the country of Canada.

Capacity

The ability of a heating or cooling system to heat or cool a given amount of space. For heating, this is usually expressed in BTUs. For cooling, it is usually given in tons.

Compressor

Part of the air conditioner or heat pump unit that controls the pressure applied to the refrigerant, necessary for taking in heat to warm your home or getting rid of heat to keep your home cool.

Condenser Coil

Part of the outdoor portion of a split-system air conditioner or heat pump. By converting refrigerant that is in a gas form back to a liquid, the coil sends heat carried by the refrigerant to the outside. Also referred to as an outdoor coil.

Downflow

A type of furnace that takes cool air from the top and blows warm air to the bottom – common where your furnaces must be located in a second-floor closet or utility area.

Ductwork

Hollow pipes used to transfer air from the Air Handler to the air vents throughout your home. Ductwork is one of the most important components of a home heating and cooling system.

EER

Energy Efficiency Ratings (EER) measures the efficiency with which a product uses energy to function. It is calculated by dividing a product’s BTU output by its wattage.

Evaporator Coil

Part of a split-system air conditioner or heat pump located indoors. The evaporator coil cools and dehumidifies the air by converting liquid refrigerant into a gas, which absorbs the heat from the air. The warmed refrigerant is then carried through a tube to the outdoor unit (condenser coil). Also referred to as an indoor coil.

Fan Coil

An indoor component of a heat pump system, used in place of a furnace, to provide additional heating on cold days when the heat pump does not provide adequate heating.

HVAC

Term used for Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning

Heat Exchanger

The part of a furnace that transfers heat to nearby air. That air is then distributed through the ductwork throughout your home.

Heat Pump

A heating and air conditioning unit that heats or cools by moving heat.

Horizontal Flow

A type of furnace, installed on its “side�?, which draws in air from one side, heats it and sends the warm air out the other side. Most often used for installations in attics or crawl spaces.

Load Estimate

A series of studies performed to determine the heating or cooling requirements of your home. An energy load analysis uses information such as the square footage of your home, window or door areas, insulation quality and local climate to determine the heating and cooling capacity needed by your furnace, heat pump, or air conditioner. When referring to heating, this is often known as a Heat Loss Analysis, since a home’s heating requirements are determined by the amount of heat lost through the roof, entry ways and walls.

Matched System

A heating and cooling system comprised of products that have been certified to perform at promised comfort and efficiency levels when used together, and used according to design and engineering specifications.

Multipoise

A multi-direction configuration that allows for both upflow and downflow installations.

Operating Cost

The day-to-day cost of running your home comfort equipment, based on energy use.

Refrigerant Lines

Two copper lines that connect the Condenser (outdoor) Coil to the Evaporator (indoor) Coil.

Split System

Refers to an air conditioner or heat pump that has components in two locations. Usually, one part of the system is located inside (evaporator coil) and the other is located outside your home (condenser coil).

Thermostat

Unit that monitors and controls your HVAC system products.

Thermostatic Expansion Valve

A thermostatic expansion valve (TXV) is a precision device used to meter the flow of liquid refrigerant entering the evaporator at a rate that matches the amount of refrigerant being boiled off in the evaporator.

Ton

A unit of measure for cooling capacity. One ton = 12,000 BTUs per hour.

UL

UL is an objective, non-profit organization that tests and rates electrical products for public safety for the United States.

Upflow

A type of furnace that draws cool air from the bottom and blows the warmed air out the top into the duct work. This type of furnace is usually installed in a basement or an out-of-the-way closet.

*Information courtesy of www.energystar.gov